The Big 3 - Tees
The Big 3 - Tees
The Big 3 - Tees
The Big 3 - Tees
The Big 3 - Tees
The Big 3 - Tees
The Big 3 - Tees
The Big 3 - Tees
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The Big 3 - Tees

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The Other Founding Father: John Lewis

The Other Hamilton: Miss Mary Hamilton

The Other Rosas: Catherine Burks-Brooks or Sarah Keys

The Big 3: Mary, Catherine, and John

These 4 tee shirts pay tribute to several key activists of the civil rights movement: John Lewis, Mary Hamilton, Catherine Burks-Brooks, and Sarah Keys. The sample shown is a women's tee. Blank shirts show the difference between men's higher and women's slightly lower necklines.

George Washington has long been referred to as a founding father of the United States. I'm sure you've heard of him. The late and Honorable Congressman John Lewis, has been referred to as a founding father of the civil rights movement, where the government was implored to live up to the ideals it professed. Hopefully, you've heard of him too. 

As for Rosa Parks, there were others who engaged in the risky business pointing out the systemic inequity in public transportation. More than a half dozen women refused to give up their seats before Rosa (1955), some long before (Irene Morgan, 1944, and Elizabeth Jennings, 1854) and roughly 436 men and women, in 1961, would follow after her, thus the number 444. One who went, unpremeditated, before her was Army Private Sarah Keys. And among the many to follow, was journalist, social worker, and teacher Catherine Burks-Brooks.

Another undeservedly lesser know figure was Mary Hamilton. When she was brought into court, with fellow Freedom Riders, Hamilton was denied the basic courtesy that was being routinely extended to her white counterparts. Extremely polite and equally principled, Hamilton was incensed, and chose not to respond to any judge or officer of the court who did not address her respectfully. And none of them did.

Hamilton's ensuing jail time was no easy row to hoe. She bore a great deal of abuse, most of which I won't list here. But she was not one to cave or be trifled with. In one instance she told a jailer who intended to rape her that he'd have to kill her first. When the mayor visited her in jail, she told him if couldn't properly address her as a lady, he could get the hell out of her cell.

Miss Mary Lucille Hamilton took her complaint to court -- all the way to the supreme court -- and, winning her case, terminated a custom of systemic disrespect that was a hallmark of white supremacy for centuries. Think about that. Mary might be a Hamilton even MORE worth crowing about.

All tees comes in men's and women's small, medium, large, and extra-large. SEND A CHAT with any questions.

If you wish to bulk order (4 or more of one item – not one of multiple items) going to a single address, SEND A CHAT first. I may be able to give you a break on shipping.